tastefullyoffensive:

Video: Nick Offerman Recites Some Profound Shower Thoughts [gifs via]
tastefullyoffensive:

Video: Nick Offerman Recites Some Profound Shower Thoughts [gifs via]
tastefullyoffensive:

Video: Nick Offerman Recites Some Profound Shower Thoughts [gifs via]
tastefullyoffensive:

Video: Nick Offerman Recites Some Profound Shower Thoughts [gifs via]
tastefullyoffensive:

Video: Nick Offerman Recites Some Profound Shower Thoughts [gifs via]
tastefullyoffensive:

Video: Nick Offerman Recites Some Profound Shower Thoughts [gifs via]
tastefullyoffensive:

Video: Nick Offerman Recites Some Profound Shower Thoughts [gifs via]
tastefullyoffensive:

Video: Nick Offerman Recites Some Profound Shower Thoughts [gifs via]
tastefullyoffensive:

Video: Nick Offerman Recites Some Profound Shower Thoughts [gifs via]

It was May of 2012 at a security conference in Calgary, Alberta, when professor Ron Deibert heard a former high-ranking official suggest he should be prosecuted. This wasn’t too surprising.

Peace in #Ferguson

The question was put to New York Times Magazine readers by journalist Robert Draper, who has elicited disdainful responses from Paul Krugman of the Times, Jonathan Chait of New York, and my colleague David Frum.

Ferguson is about many things, starting first with race and policing in America. But it’s also about internet, net neutrality and algorithmic filtering.

Anyone who thinks race does not skew the application of criminal justice in this country is just not paying close enough attention, Sen. Rand Paul writes for TIME, amid violence in Ferguson, Mo.

A Black person is murdered by cops, security guards or self-appointed vigilantes every 28 hours in the U.S.

retrogasm:

Andy Taylor said that…